Category: Sureset Blog

Posted 12th January 2012 by Kevin Weston

Regeneration Project Tickle Cock Bridge

During the summer SureSet was involved in a regeneration project in Castleford, Yorkshire. The project was aimed to rejuvenate and enliven an underpass called Tickle Cock Bridge which has been the subject of much attention throughout the years.

The Victorian structure, originally built in 1890, has been the focus of a number of regeneration schemes in recent times. In 2005, one scheme was the subject of controversy when it was replaced by a prefabricated concrete tunnel and then renamed ‘Tittle Cott Bridge’. Wakefield council then reversed the decision after residents of Castleford protested against the politically correct alternative to the traditional risqué name for the Victorian landmark.

In 2008 further improvements were made with the introduction of an angular concrete seating feature and to symbolise the areas colourful history the walls were lined with a tactile red flock material mounted on an aluminium honeycomb structure seen below.

This red cladding however did not keep its colour particularly well and after a while became prone to vandalism and graffiti.  In 2010 Wakefield Council commissioned NPS North East Limited to develop proposals for regeneration that would reflect the history of Castleford, be attractive and include the local community.

Consideration was given to a number of potential systems including using laminate panels and perforated aluminium panels. Instead it was decided that the most effective method to achieve the desired effect would be to include resin bound recycled glass aggregates set within bespoke metal trays that clad the walls and seating feature. The use of glass is particularly relevant since in the 19th century Castleford was one of the largest glass manufacturing towns in Britain, producing 20,000,000 glass bottles and jars a year.

SureSet was chosen to supply the resin bound materials which were to be used in the design, however when we learned of how the community would be getting involved we offered to oversee the use of our products. Three events hosted at the Bridge Arts Centre saw pupils from St Josephs and Smawthorne Henry Moore Primary Schools design and then create approximately 60 fish with our colourful glass aggregates.

Jacqui Anslow (above-centre) of SureSet UK Ltd went along to help the pupils and the organisers properly apply the SureSet to the preformed ‘fish’ shapes. We would also like to acknowledge the role of our Approved Installer RP Harrison Ltd for their help in overseeing the community involvement sessions and the further application of the SureSet to the metal trays as seen below. In total six colours from our Spectrum and Recycled Glass ranges were used for the project including 3mm Pure Orange, 3mm Mint Green, 3mm Water Blue, 3mm Pastel Blue, 3mm Traffic Red and 3mm Pacific Blue.

These aggregates were mixed with our resin, applied to the metal trays and left to cure. Once cured the trays could then be fixed to the walls and seating area. This is just one example of the artistic value of SureSet resin bound paving. With some creative thinking and the proper application of skill, the potential for creativity is infinite. Whether you utilize our unrivalled installation expertise or if you wish to create your own work of art using our DIY kits SureSet resin bound paving can bring any design to life.

Commenting on SureSets and her own involvement in the project Jacqui Anslow stated that “Initially it was great to learn that from all of the proposed designs and products available to the Council they chose SureSet, but it was even more exciting for us to be involved with the community project.  Working hands on with the children was inspiring and fun and they all seemed to really enjoy the activities.  I’ve got a good feeling we may even see some budding young designers develop from this experience. I am really happy to have been involved in such a worthwhile project and am glad that the area looks so great with our product at the heart of it”.